News & Info

Residents urged to be alert to courier fraud scam

Residents are being warned about a courier fraud scam operating in Norfolk by suspects claiming to be police officers.

 

In the last few weeks, police have seen a rise in incident where cold-callers will make efforts to defraud victims of money, often stating they need to withdraw large sums in connection with an investigation.

 

Officers are investigating an incident which happened on Tuesday (6 July) where a woman in West Winch was conned out of £4,200. Following a cold-call from a man claiming to be a police officer, the victim went to her bank and withdrew the money, believing she was helping an investigation into counterfeit money. After withdrawing money, she returned home where a ‘courier’ collected the cash, and telephoned the victim later on to confirm it was counterfeit.

 

A second attempt that day is also being investigated after a man from Clenchwarton was cold-called by someone claiming to be from Hertforshire Police who said they were investigating a theft from the victim’s bank account. The man was asked to withdraw £9,000 which would be collected following day. The victim managed to withdraw £2,000 and told a family member about the incident who immediately reported it to police. No money was handed over.

 

Detective Inspector Richard Weller, from Swaffham CID, urged people to make elderly or vulnerable relatives and neighbours aware of the scam.

 

He said: "This type of courier fraud is nothing new; suspects will often approach victims under the guise of a police officer, bank or government department, in an effort to win trust and encourage people to go along with the scam.

 

"They will often use a range of techniques and in these most recent incidents, cold callers claim to be police officers investigating bank account thefts and counterfeit money. These scammers can be really convincing, making the caller feel they are helping a genuine police investigation, compelling them to withdraw the money. Suspects will then arrange to collect the money from the victim.

 

"More often than not, we’re talking large sums of cash into the thousands which is ultimately people’s savings and funds they rely on.

 

"Police officers will never ask you to withdraw money, or send someone to collect money. We know scammers target the elderly and I would urge people to make their family members, friends and neighbours aware of this scam and the warning signs.”

 

Further advice includes:

  • Your bank or the police will NEVER ask for your PIN, bank card or bank account details over the phone – never give these details to anybody.

  • Neither the police nor the banks will send a courier to collect money from you.

  • Always request Photo ID and if unsure call the police.

  • If you're asked to telephone a bank, then always do it on a different phone to the one you were contacted on.

  • Fraudsters will keep the line open and have been known to play ringtones, hold music and a recorded message down the phone so the victim believes they are making a call to a legitimate number. Ensure you can hear a dialling tone before calling police or use a friend or neighbour's telephone instead.

  • Do not rush into complying to the scammers demands / requests.

  • If you have already given your bank details over the phone or handed your card details to a courier, call you bank straight away to cancel the card .  

 

If anyone has received a similar type of telephone call or has any information about these incidents. Contact Norfolk Police on 101 quoting Operation Radium.  

 

Alternatively, Contact the independent charity Crimestoppers 100% anonymously on 0800 555 111.

Community Safety Plan

The Norfolk County Community Safety Partnership (NCCSP) has launched an eight-week consultation to understand what residents believe will make Norfolk a safer place to live, work and visit.

 

The NCCSP develops a Community Safety Plan which sets out the priorities which partners will focus on. Having carried out an assessment of crime and community safety issues, the NCCSP has drafted a new three-year plan which proposes seven priorities.

 

The partnership now wants to hear from Norfolk residents whether they feel the priorities correctly reflect the issues which matter most to them.

 

The proposed priorities are:

 

  • Serious violence

  • Domestic and sexual abuse

  • Preventing terrorism

  • Criminal exploitation, including modern slavery and county lines drug dealing

  • Neighbourhood crimes like robbery, burglary, anti-social behaviour, vehicle crime and other theft offences

  • Hate crime and community tensions

  • Fraud

 

The NCCSP brings together organisations from across Norfolk to tackle crime and disorder, and ensure the county remains a safe place for all.

 

The partnership is currently supported by the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner for Norfolk (OPCCN) and is chaired by the OPCCN Chief Executive Mark Stokes.

 

The consultation will run for eight weeks from 24 May 2021, closing on 16 July 2021.

 

For more information on the priorities and proposed outcomes and to take part in the survey visit https://www.norfolk-pcc.gov.uk/police-and-crime-plan/working-in-partnership/community-safety/nccsp-strategic-plan-consultation/

Protect your dog from thieves

•    Never leave your pet tied-up unattended, such as outside shops for example.
•    Make sure your dog is wearing a collar and ID tag when in a public place, as you are now required to do by law. Include your surname, telephone number, address and full post code and if there’s room, put ‘microchipped’ on the tag if your dog has a chip.
•    Ensure your dog can be permanently identified by its microchip or tattoo. A microchip is normally sufficient to identify your pet if it does become lost or stolen.
•    Ask your vet to check your dog’s microchip every year to ensure your details are accurate and up-to-date.
•    Train your dog not to go out of your sight on walks. Use an extending lead if the dog does not comply. Vary your walk times and routes.
•    Beware of strangers who show interest in your dog: don’t give details about your dog. Don’t allow strangers to have their photograph taken with your dog.
•    Ensure your garden or yard is secure.  Check it regularly for wear and tear or gaps. It should keep your dog in and trespassers out. Keep your dog in view when it goes out into the garden, don’t leave it unattended.

Alabama Rot

Alabama dog rot is a disease that causes damage to a dog’s blood vessels and the kidney. It is a mysterious disease which is hard to identify and sadly, very difficult to treat. It can cause a dog’s skin to rot as it eats the flesh of the animal which makes it a particularly distressing disease. Cases have recently been reported in Guist.

 

There are no specific steps you can take to prevent your dog from contracting the disease, but there is evidence of seasonal fluctuation, with most cases appearing between November and June. 

Evidence suggests that the disease spreads from muddy and wooded areas – dog owners who walk their dogs in these places are advised to wash off any mud as soon as possible, and of course, keep close control of their dogs at all times to monitor where they go.

Key Signs:

The first sign of Alabama Rot is skin sores that have not been caused by a physical injury. These sores can present as lesions, swelling, a patch of red skin, or may be open and ulcer-like. The sores are most commonly found below the knee or elbow or occasionally on the stomach or face. Usually, this will cause localised hair loss and the dog will begin licking the wound. These lesions will be followed – between two and seven days later – with outward symptoms of kidney failure: reduced appetite, fatigue, and vomiting. Affected dogs will also develop signs of severe depression, loss of appetite and vomiting, quickly accompanied by acute injury to the kidneys.

The best outcomes can be achieved by catching it early and the dog receiving high-quality veterinary care. Whilst some infected dogs do survive the treatments of skin sores and kidney failure, unfortunately, many do not – it is estimated that treatment is only successful in around 20-30% of cases. It is important, however, not to get overly worried by this as the percentage of dogs in the UK who have contracted this disease is truly minuscule. Though, what is vital, is that you understand the problem and know what to look out for, should your dog come into contact with it, as time plays a large part in successfully treating the disease.
 

School Readers Norfolk

Reading volunteers are desperately needed because of the Coronavirus pandemic. Thousands of children won’t have had enough reading practice during the first lockdown let alone the second. In a normal year, one in four children leave primary school unable to read well. Most children will have missed a term of school, so the reading gap is now even wider. Children who struggle with reading are more likely to live in poverty and be unemployed as adults. 

 

Schoolreaders needs more volunteers in your area to support children’s reading and prevent them falling further behind. If you want to make a difference to a child’s life, apply to become a Schoolreader. No qualifications are needed; just a love of reading and some spare time each week.  

 

To join us, please visit the website www.schoolreaders.org/volunteer-application-form

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The Commons in Brisley

All residents who live adjacent to any of the commons in Brisley should check the relevant map below and ensure no encroachment is taking place from their property. 

Although the Parish Council is aware of some encroachment, we do not intend to take any action at this point, although we reserve the right to do so. This is simply to make everyone aware of the boundaries.

Your co-operation is much appreciated.

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